Kids’ Reads to Honor Black History Month

February marks Black History Month, an important time to recognize and learn about African American history and contributions.  Here are some wonderful books to read all year round, especially during this time of the year.

 

Trailblazer: The Story of Ballerina Raven Wilkinsonby Leda Schubert, Illustrated by Theodore Taylor III

This beautiful picture book tells the little-known story of Raven Wilkinson, the first African American woman to dance for a major classical ballet company and an inspiration to Misty Copeland.

“A moving profile of Raven Wilkinson, the first African-American woman to dance with a major American touring ballet company.” ~ Publishers Weekly

(free discussion guide available)

 

 

Fancy Party Gowns: The Story of Fashion Designer Ann Cole Lowe by Deborah Blumenthal, Illustrated by Laura Freeman
Be inspired by little-known visionary Ann Cole Lowe, who persevered in times of hardship and became a top fashion designer.

“Kudos to a title that recognizes a previously uncelebrated African-American woman of achievement.” ~ Kirkus Reviews

(free discussion guide available)

 

 

 

 

Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford, Illustrated by R. Gregory Christie
A poetic nonfiction picture book about a little-known piece of African American history that captures a human’s capacity to find hope and joy in difficult circumstances and demonstrates how New Orleans’ Congo Square was truly freedom’s heart.

“Weatherford and Christie dazzlingly salute African-Americans’ drive to preserve their dignity and pride.”  ~ Kirkus Reviews

(free discussion guide available)

 

 

 

 

Civil Rights Movement, by Nancy Ohlin, Illustrated by Roger Simo

This engaging nonfiction book, complete with black-and-white interior illustrations, covers everything from Jim Crow laws and protests to major milestones like Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights Act, and more

 

 

 

 

The Civil War by Nancy Ohlin, Illustrated by Adam Larkum

It covers everything from how the war started to what life was like in the North and South, and more. Find out interesting, little-known facts such as what the code language of the Underground Railroad meant and how soldiers spent their free time.

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